"Spontaneously performing in public has the potential to connote negative associations such as terrorism, insanity, or any kind of disturbance of peace… Performing in a private space tempers and frames the body in a way that forces the audience to assume the performer has a purpose. The barrier of the stage is therefore created, and decreases the threat and fear of failure for the performance."Jacolby Satterwhite

[Step and Repeat performance GIFs by Sarah Wintner.]

Step and RepeatReblogged from Step and Repeat

mocastepandrepeat:

Photos from the first week of Step and Repeat at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, September 13, 2014:

From top: Vanessa Place; P. Morris; staged reading of Twelve by Ann Hirsch, with Hirsch, Eugene Kotlyarenko, Guthrie Lonergan, Jeff Baij, and Dasha Nekrasova; Jacolby Satterwhite in collaboration with Ashland Mines; audience for SFV Acid and the Valley Sound; Seth Bogart and Peggy Noland at Wacky Wacko pop-up store; Dynasty Handbag.

Photography (c) Joshua White/ JWPICTURES.com and Myles Pettengill.

Tickets now on sale for this Saturday’s edition.

STEP AND REPEAT
Saturday, September 13th
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
TICKETS ON SALE

Dynasty Handbag is the alter ego of New York-based video and performance artist Jibz Cameron. Her work has been presented at art centers, festivals, theaters, and museums, such as The Museum of Modern Art (New York), the New Museum (New York), and MOCA, as well as international dives both great and small, and has been heralded by The New York Times as “the funniest and most pitch perfect performance seen in years.” Catch her tomorrow night at Step and Repeat.

Dynasty Handbag - Remote Penetration - Artist Video Projects - MOCAtv 

Step and RepeatReblogged from Step and Repeat

mocastepandrepeat:

MOCA has a long and rich history with performance. The very first program the museum presented when The Temporary Contemporary (now The Geffen Contemporary) opened in 1983 was a dance work by Lucinda Childs called Available Light. It featured set design by Frank Gehry and a score by John Adams. It was an auspicious beginning for a museum that would come to pride itself on experimentation.

Since then, an extremely wide range of programs—all somehow related to this word performance—have appeared at MOCA, including works by: Mike Kelley, Meredith Monk, Michael Smith, Eric Bogosian, the Squat Theater, The Wooster Group, Karen Finley, Wallace Shawn, William Leavitt, Peter Sellars, and Chris & Cosey. Reading series have included such illustrious writers as: William T. Vollmann, Sherman Alexie, Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia E. Butler, Wanda Coleman, Adrienne Rich, and Harryette Mullen. On a more pop tip, the museum has hosted such notables as Grandmaster Flash, Santigold, X, Diplo, Blonde Redhead, and the Dead Kennedys.

Even though MOCA does not have a department devoted to performance—the museum has never had medium-specific departments as such—we have always assumed that contemporary art touches everything. Indeed, to be contemporary, to do justice to the innovations and experiments of art, MOCA has always sought to present culture in the broadest sense.

[PHOTOS: Available Light, 1983; Explorations I, 1983; Summer 1985: Nine Artists, 1985; Reno Enraged, 1990; Action Occupation, 1995; Live Sprawl, 2008. The Temporary Contemporary/The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA.]

STEP AND REPEATSaturday, September 13thThe Geffen Contemporary at MOCATICKETS ON SALE
Ann Hirsch presents Twelve: a staged reading of her censored e-book (2013) set in a late 1990s AOL chatroom, chronicling the young artist’s virtual exploits. She will be joined by Jeff Baij, Eugene Kotlyarenko, Guthrie Lonergan, Rachel Lord, Dasha Nekrasova, Jesse Stecklow, and Rebecca Veith.
Hirsch is a video and performance artist who examines the influence of technology on popular culture and gender. Her immersive research has included becoming a YouTube camwhore with over two million video views and an appearance as a contestant on Frank the Entertainer…In a Basement Affair on Vh1. 

High-res

STEP AND REPEAT
Saturday, September 13th
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
TICKETS ON SALE

Ann Hirsch presents Twelve: a staged reading of her censored e-book (2013) set in a late 1990s AOL chatroom, chronicling the young artist’s virtual exploits. She will be joined by Jeff Baij, Eugene Kotlyarenko, Guthrie Lonergan, Rachel Lord, Dasha Nekrasova, Jesse Stecklow, and Rebecca Veith.

Hirsch is a video and performance artist who examines the influence of technology on popular culture and gender. Her immersive research has included becoming a YouTube camwhore with over two million video views and an appearance as a contestant on Frank the Entertainer…In a Basement Affair on Vh1. 

STEP AND REPEAT
Saturday, September 13th
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Vanessa Place with Samantha Gorman | Rae Armantrout | SFV Acid with The Valley Sound | Ann Hirsch | Dynasty Handbag | Jacolby Satterwhite with Ashland Mines | Toca Talent presents P. Morris, Rare Times, and Ille

6–11PM
Doors open at 5:30

TICKETS ON SALE

[PHOTOS: Vanessa Place by Lawrence Schwartzwald; Ashland Mines by Jake Michaels; Dynasty Handbag by Ian Douglas; Ille by Aliya Naumoff; SFV Acid.]

Low Concept is the Berlin-based duo formed by acclaimed electronic producers Ville Haimala (Renaissance Man, Millennium) and Daniel Fisher (Physical Therapy). Known for their experimental take on dance music, Low Concept is their attempt to make literally low concept, functional music for the dancefloor. 

The title track of their debut EP, “Bugz” is delivered from the point of view of a DJ, looking down the teeming masses of dancers below the booth. The relationship between the DJ and the dancers, and the animalistic nature of nightlife, is made more explicit by the placement of live bugs in a scale model of a club.

The model is designed and constructed by Haimala, an architect by trade. The model, which measures only one square meter, is filled with 200 beetles, and an African cockroach and praying mantis, which represent the DJ and the security guard.

Low Concept - Bugs - Art + Music - MOCAtv

Ahead of his much-anticipated SS15 season, TELFAR, the eponymous unisex line of Liberian-American fashion prodigy Telfar Clemens, releases its A/W 2014 video look-book “TCTV” for W Magazine. Clemens’ second collaboration with director Babak Radboy of the notorious meta-brand Shanzhai Biennial takes a key premise — that TELFAR is not an underground label but a global mega-brand — to new heights of unreasonableness. “TCTV” epitomizes the TELFAR motto: Extremely Normal™.

TCTV: TELFAR A/W 2014 - Art + Fashion - MOCAtv

Next month MOCA returns to live arts programming with Step and Repeat, a mash-up of new voices in performance art, music and sound art, comedy, and poetry from across the United States. In the spirit of the series, we’re looking back at performances at The Geffen.

Today it’s Available Light, a 1983 collaboration between composer John Adams, choreographer Lucinda Childs, and architect Frank Gehry. Head to The Curve for behind-the-scenes photography, including these pictures by Garry Winogrand.

Step and Repeat is a mash-up of new voices in performance art, music and sound art, comedy, and poetry from across the United States, with a special focus on the burgeoning performance communities in Los Angeles.
Step and Repeat announces MOCA’s return to live arts programming, a crucial part of the museum’s historical identity. The program will stretch across four Saturdays this September and October, with a line-up of participants that bridges visual art performance, dance, noise music, poetry, and comedy.
Lineup announced and tickets on sale August 29. High-res

Step and Repeat is a mash-up of new voices in performance art, music and sound art, comedy, and poetry from across the United States, with a special focus on the burgeoning performance communities in Los Angeles.

Step and Repeat announces MOCA’s return to live arts programming, a crucial part of the museum’s historical identity. The program will stretch across four Saturdays this September and October, with a line-up of participants that bridges visual art performance, dance, noise music, poetry, and comedy.

Lineup announced and tickets on sale August 29.

Hannah WilkeWhite Plains, 1975Voltex, Liquitex, and snaps18 x 24 x 8 in. (45.7 x 61 x 20.3 cm)The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Gift of Ruth and Jacob Bloom
"It’s amazing to me that Wilke was making work like this at a time when the art world was dominated by cold, intellectual, impersonal works of minimalism and conceptual art, most of which were produced by male artists."—Micol Hebron, artist and organizer, on White Plains, now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue.
LISTEN: Hebron discusses how teaching high school influenced “one of her art heroines.” High-res

Hannah Wilke
White Plains, 1975
Voltex, Liquitex, and snaps
18 x 24 x 8 in. (45.7 x 61 x 20.3 cm)
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Gift of Ruth and Jacob Bloom

"It’s amazing to me that Wilke was making work like this at a time when the art world was dominated by cold, intellectual, impersonal works of minimalism and conceptual art, most of which were produced by male artists."—Micol Hebron, artist and organizer, on White Plains, now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue.

LISTEN: Hebron discusses how teaching high school influenced “one of her art heroines.”

"In this whole house, I can’t get this story. I get fragments of this story, I get a sense of the story. But the story really never distills into a coherent narrative. And then I find I have to project my own story into these spaces. My own idea of the American dream. But then, these troubling floating heads, and their sight lines on the periphery, on the edges of these photos. They create enough of a problem, that I keep spinning, I keep spinning, and I keep spinning. It’s really a wonderful work."
Listen to Todd Gray’s close read of John Baldessari’s Some Rooms. This work from our permanent collection is on view now at MOCA Grand Avenue.
[John Baldessari, Some Rooms, 1986, gouache, black and white photographs. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Gift of The Broad Art Foundation.] High-res

"In this whole house, I can’t get this story. I get fragments of this story, I get a sense of the story. But the story really never distills into a coherent narrative. And then I find I have to project my own story into these spaces. My own idea of the American dream. But then, these troubling floating heads, and their sight lines on the periphery, on the edges of these photos. They create enough of a problem, that I keep spinning, I keep spinning, and I keep spinning. It’s really a wonderful work."

Listen to Todd Gray’s close read of John Baldessari’s Some Rooms. This work from our permanent collection is on view now at MOCA Grand Avenue.

[John Baldessari, Some Rooms, 1986, gouache, black and white photographs. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Gift of The Broad Art Foundation.]

Allen RuppersbergStill Life, 1982Acrylic on canvas with ten concrete headsPaintings: 96 x 66 in. eachThe Museum of Contemporary Art, Los AngelesGift of anonymous donor and the artist
"What’s probably most comedic to me is the writing of the article. It focuses so much on the cars, and whether they got automatic or stick shift transmissions. There’s that line, ‘we had a little chit-chat, and then I asked him to kill my mom.’ That all feels like bad ’80s horror movie writing to me.”—Brian Kennon
Still Life is now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue. Listen to an audio interview with Kennon about his L.A. connection to the work on The Curve. High-res

Allen Ruppersberg
Still Life, 1982
Acrylic on canvas with ten concrete heads
Paintings: 96 x 66 in. each
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Gift of anonymous donor and the artist

"What’s probably most comedic to me is the writing of the article. It focuses so much on the cars, and whether they got automatic or stick shift transmissions. There’s that line, ‘we had a little chit-chat, and then I asked him to kill my mom.’ That all feels like bad ’80s horror movie writing to me.”—Brian Kennon

Still Life is now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue. Listen to an audio interview with Kennon about his L.A. connection to the work on The Curve.