Next month MOCA returns to live arts programming with Step and Repeat, a mash-up of new voices in performance art, music and sound art, comedy, and poetry from across the United States. In the spirit of the series, we’re looking back at performances at The Geffen.

Today it’s Available Light, a 1983 collaboration between composer John Adams, choreographer Lucinda Childs, and architect Frank Gehry. Head to The Curve for behind-the-scenes photography, including these pictures by Garry Winogrand.

Step and Repeat is a mash-up of new voices in performance art, music and sound art, comedy, and poetry from across the United States, with a special focus on the burgeoning performance communities in Los Angeles.
Step and Repeat announces MOCA’s return to live arts programming, a crucial part of the museum’s historical identity. The program will stretch across four Saturdays this September and October, with a line-up of participants that bridges visual art performance, dance, noise music, poetry, and comedy.
Lineup announced and tickets on sale August 29. High-res

Step and Repeat is a mash-up of new voices in performance art, music and sound art, comedy, and poetry from across the United States, with a special focus on the burgeoning performance communities in Los Angeles.

Step and Repeat announces MOCA’s return to live arts programming, a crucial part of the museum’s historical identity. The program will stretch across four Saturdays this September and October, with a line-up of participants that bridges visual art performance, dance, noise music, poetry, and comedy.

Lineup announced and tickets on sale August 29.

Hannah WilkeWhite Plains, 1975Voltex, Liquitex, and snaps18 x 24 x 8 in. (45.7 x 61 x 20.3 cm)The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Gift of Ruth and Jacob Bloom
"It’s amazing to me that Wilke was making work like this at a time when the art world was dominated by cold, intellectual, impersonal works of minimalism and conceptual art, most of which were produced by male artists."—Micol Hebron, artist and organizer, on White Plains, now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue.
LISTEN: Hebron discusses how teaching high school influenced “one of her art heroines.” High-res

Hannah Wilke
White Plains, 1975
Voltex, Liquitex, and snaps
18 x 24 x 8 in. (45.7 x 61 x 20.3 cm)
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Gift of Ruth and Jacob Bloom

"It’s amazing to me that Wilke was making work like this at a time when the art world was dominated by cold, intellectual, impersonal works of minimalism and conceptual art, most of which were produced by male artists."—Micol Hebron, artist and organizer, on White Plains, now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue.

LISTEN: Hebron discusses how teaching high school influenced “one of her art heroines.”

"In this whole house, I can’t get this story. I get fragments of this story, I get a sense of the story. But the story really never distills into a coherent narrative. And then I find I have to project my own story into these spaces. My own idea of the American dream. But then, these troubling floating heads, and their sight lines on the periphery, on the edges of these photos. They create enough of a problem, that I keep spinning, I keep spinning, and I keep spinning. It’s really a wonderful work."
Listen to Todd Gray’s close read of John Baldessari’s Some Rooms. This work from our permanent collection is on view now at MOCA Grand Avenue.
[John Baldessari, Some Rooms, 1986, gouache, black and white photographs. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Gift of The Broad Art Foundation.] High-res

"In this whole house, I can’t get this story. I get fragments of this story, I get a sense of the story. But the story really never distills into a coherent narrative. And then I find I have to project my own story into these spaces. My own idea of the American dream. But then, these troubling floating heads, and their sight lines on the periphery, on the edges of these photos. They create enough of a problem, that I keep spinning, I keep spinning, and I keep spinning. It’s really a wonderful work."

Listen to Todd Gray’s close read of John Baldessari’s Some Rooms. This work from our permanent collection is on view now at MOCA Grand Avenue.

[John Baldessari, Some Rooms, 1986, gouache, black and white photographs. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Gift of The Broad Art Foundation.]

Allen RuppersbergStill Life, 1982Acrylic on canvas with ten concrete headsPaintings: 96 x 66 in. eachThe Museum of Contemporary Art, Los AngelesGift of anonymous donor and the artist
"What’s probably most comedic to me is the writing of the article. It focuses so much on the cars, and whether they got automatic or stick shift transmissions. There’s that line, ‘we had a little chit-chat, and then I asked him to kill my mom.’ That all feels like bad ’80s horror movie writing to me.”—Brian Kennon
Still Life is now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue. Listen to an audio interview with Kennon about his L.A. connection to the work on The Curve. High-res

Allen Ruppersberg
Still Life, 1982
Acrylic on canvas with ten concrete heads
Paintings: 96 x 66 in. each
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Gift of anonymous donor and the artist

"What’s probably most comedic to me is the writing of the article. It focuses so much on the cars, and whether they got automatic or stick shift transmissions. There’s that line, ‘we had a little chit-chat, and then I asked him to kill my mom.’ That all feels like bad ’80s horror movie writing to me.”—Brian Kennon

Still Life is now on view at MOCA Grand Avenue. Listen to an audio interview with Kennon about his L.A. connection to the work on The Curve.

Andy Warhol (b. 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; d. 1987, New York)Telephone, 1962Casein and pencil on linen72 x 54 x 2 1/2 in.The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los AngelesPurchased with funds provided by an anonymous donor
"Everybody has their own America, and then they have pieces of a fantasy America that they think is out there but they can’t see. When I was little, I never left Pennsylvania, and I used to have fantasies about things that I thought were happening…that I felt I was missing out on. But you can only live life in one place at a time…you live in your dream America that you’ve custom-made from art and schmaltz and emotions just as much as you live in your real one."
Happy birthday Andy Warhol! High-res

Andy Warhol (b. 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; d. 1987, New York)
Telephone, 1962
Casein and pencil on linen
72 x 54 x 2 1/2 in.
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Purchased with funds provided by an anonymous donor

"Everybody has their own America, and then they have pieces of a fantasy America that they think is out there but they can’t see. When I was little, I never left Pennsylvania, and I used to have fantasies about things that I thought were happening…that I felt I was missing out on. But you can only live life in one place at a time…you live in your dream America that you’ve custom-made from art and schmaltz and emotions just as much as you live in your real one."

Happy birthday Andy Warhol!

Richard Prince (b. 1949, Panama Canal Zone; lives and works in Upstate New York)
Untitled (Living Rooms), 1977
Four Ektacolor prints
Each image: 14 3/4 x 23 1/4 in.
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Purchased with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a Federal Agency, and Councilman Joel Wachs

Happy birthday Richard Prince!

Bruce NaumanBouncing Two Balls Between the Floor and Ceiling with Changing Rhythms, 1967-6810 minb&w, sound, 16 mm film on video
In his ten-minute conceptual film, Nauman attempts to keep two bouncing balls within a taped-off square. Two years later, Nauman parodied his own work in Bouncing Balls (1969), a nine-minute video in which he bounces his testicles with his hand. The video would inspire a new work by Francesco Vezzoli titled The Return of Bruce Nauman’s Bouncing Balls (2006), in which porn star Brad Rock theatrically sways, in the nude, for the camera.
(NSFW) The Return of Bruce Nauman’s Bouncing Balls - Cinema Vezzoli - Artist Video Projects - MOCAtv   High-res

Bruce Nauman
Bouncing Two Balls Between the Floor and Ceiling with Changing Rhythms, 1967-68
10 min
b&w, sound, 16 mm film on video

In his ten-minute conceptual film, Nauman attempts to keep two bouncing balls within a taped-off square. Two years later, Nauman parodied his own work in Bouncing Balls (1969), a nine-minute video in which he bounces his testicles with his hand. The video would inspire a new work by Francesco Vezzoli titled The Return of Bruce Nauman’s Bouncing Balls (2006), in which porn star Brad Rock theatrically sways, in the nude, for the camera.

(NSFW) The Return of Bruce Nauman’s Bouncing Balls - Cinema Vezzoli - Artist Video Projects - MOCAtv  

“Andy Warhol’s Shadows are the line between the American dream and the American death. They are as dark as they are glamorous; they are as meditative as they are explosively hallucinatory; they are mourning mirrors with no reflections; they are a long film strip of serial images that evoke experimental film and the drones of the Velvet Underground. They are visual music.”
MOCA presents Andy Warhol: Shadows, the first West Coast presentation of Shadows (1978-79), a monumental painting in 102 parts, September 20, 2014-February 2, 2015 at MOCA Grand Avenue. Andy Warhol: Shadows is organized by Dia Art Foundation and coordinated by MOCA Senior Curator Bennett Simpson.
[IMAGE: Andy Warhol, Shadows (1978–79). Dia Art Foundation. © 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York.] High-res

“Andy Warhol’s Shadows are the line between the American dream and the American death. They are as dark as they are glamorous; they are as meditative as they are explosively hallucinatory; they are mourning mirrors with no reflections; they are a long film strip of serial images that evoke experimental film and the drones of the Velvet Underground. They are visual music.”

MOCA presents Andy Warhol: Shadows, the first West Coast presentation of Shadows (1978-79), a monumental painting in 102 parts, September 20, 2014-February 2, 2015 at MOCA Grand Avenue. Andy Warhol: Shadows is organized by Dia Art Foundation and coordinated by MOCA Senior Curator Bennett Simpson.

[IMAGE: Andy Warhol, Shadows (1978–79). Dia Art Foundation. © 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York.]

momaps1:

“So the problem that I set for myself is to deal with something of our time that people can’t see as being of our time, they can only see it as of the past: a child’s worn toy. I wanted to say, no, this thing isn’t of the past, this thing’s here right now. It’s not some metaphor for childhood, this is something that an adult made. It was made maybe last week. If you’re seeing it of the past it’s because you’re meant to see it of the past. I’m interested in how that functions.”
~Mike Kelley, Excerpt from a 1991 BOMB Magazine Interview
Image: Mike Kelley. More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid and The Wages of Sin. 1987.

High-res

MoMA PS1 — Soarin' Tumblin' Freewheelin'Reblogged from MoMA PS1 — Soarin' Tumblin' Freewheelin'

momaps1:

So the problem that I set for myself is to deal with something of our time that people can’t see as being of our time, they can only see it as of the past: a child’s worn toy. I wanted to say, no, this thing isn’t of the past, this thing’s here right now. It’s not some metaphor for childhood, this is something that an adult made. It was made maybe last week. If you’re seeing it of the past it’s because you’re meant to see it of the past. I’m interested in how that functions.

~Mike Kelley, Excerpt from a 1991 BOMB Magazine Interview

Image: Mike Kelley. More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid and The Wages of Sin. 1987.